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 No.4781

File: 1582414579692.png (963.1 KB, 1080x1080, 1:1, note_2020-02-17 01 28 00.png) ImgOps Google

The 1960's and 1970's saw some rudimentary online communities, and futurists predicted increasingly better audio and visual links would allow people to diffuse from cities, presumably people wanted to live in more natural settings if jobs and social opportunities weren't concentrated.

Things didn't pan out that way, at least as far as I see.  It is true that most Americans live in suburbs, but rural areas are in decline, and younger people are more likely to end up in cities.

My question: is there something about face-to-face contact or being on site that technology isn't going to replace anytime soon -- from the perspective of employers, friends, and partners -- or is tech too clunky now, and as soon as we get good VR or something, location won't be a deciding factor in people's work and social life?

 No.4783

> The 1960's and 1970's saw some rudimentary online communities
For realsies?
There's been online internet communities in the 60s?
I didn't consider the internet mainstream until the late 80s or 90s...

> is there something about face-to-face contact or being on site that technology isn't going to replace anytime soon
Hard to say. I'm at work and I can communicate via email and skype, but I still get the message accross better in face-to-face interaction.

But online shopping is ruining local businesses and I'm a fossile when it comes to shopping still.
For now I mostly shop online for stuff that is only available online.
Overall, I don't see much better that you can do, except for automation and drone delivery. Even more at home food delivery perhaps.

 No.4784

File: 1582504432806.png (948.42 KB, 1080x1080, 1:1, note_2019-09-03 23 36 00.png) ImgOps Google

>>4783
>There's been online internet communities in the 60s?
I guess 60's is pushing it a bit.  PLATO and ARPANET birthed in the late '60s, but how much there was an online community, in the first few years, I don't know.

>I didn't consider the internet mainstream until the late 80s or 90s...

I guess it's somewhat a matter of terms, the world wide web didn't begin until the 80's or 90's.  The 70's was a time of large mainframes, however since these mainframes serviced many simultaneous users, some at remote stations, and some mainframes were interconnected as well, the small group that had access were using things much like discussion boards, e-mail, and instant messaging.  It was pretty siloed, not until later would worldwide standards for communication between systems be developed.

>I still get the message accross better in face-to-face interaction.

I'd mostly agree there.  Face-to-face seems more efficient, at least for some things.

>retail, drone delivery
The book The End of Man, which is classed as satire, so I think in part it was suppose to be making fun of all the futuristic predictions at the time by taking it to the extreme, imagined a conveyor belt to everyone's house.

People still do a lot of shopping offline, supporting local business is one reason certainly.  Living in apartments, I've found delivery uncertain (for example, the UPS guy can't get into our building so unless I want to wait all day at the door, getting my package is a bit of a questionable thing), but that's a bug that I assume will be worked out by the likes of Amazon eventually.

 No.4787

>>4781
Touch is still always going to matter when it comes right down to it.

But as long as its in there somewhere, the sky's the limit on remote togetherness.

 No.4788

I think economic factors explain it sufficiently, no need to square it with the fact that social media exists and is more technologically advanced than it was in the 70s.


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